Our Logo Design Process

At Logos Associated, our logo designers know that while every memorable logo begins with a great idea – that’s only one fragment of its back story.

 

Coming up with extraordinary logo design ideas is rarely a smooth process, even for the best logo design agency in Mumbai. There may not be a standard template out there for creating a great logo, but a highly developed, highly flexible process us to find our inspiration.

 

Here are our 12 most important steps on designing a logo, which are the processes that we use as a highly experienced and successful logo design company in Mumbai, India.

Logo Design Process Step 1: Starting with a strategy

Brand strategy serves as the foundation for creating outstanding logos. Our logo designers and our clients collaborate on a plan. Strategies are important because they provide guidance. You’ll constantly be on the back foot if you don’t do some real up-front thinking and have a sound brief.

We need a clear objective when we start on the logo design ideas. Your logo designs will simply not survive the test of time if you don’t have a strong foundation on which to create your brand. Without some agreed-upon criteria against which to measure your judgments, everything may come down to someone pointing at a design at random and stating, “I’m not sure why, but I like that one.”

We do some research on our own by talking to our clients about who they are, what they stand for, how they view themselves, and how they’d like their consumers to see them (ideally from multiple perspectives).

It’s critical to start with a clear creative brief, whether or not you have a brand strategy document. That involves taking more than a few scribbled notes on your first phone call or meeting. Together we determine what makes your company unique and how you’ll position it in the marketplace. So that everyone knows where they are and what to expect, write down your thoughts and ask your customer to sign off on your strategy. Remember, the goal is to have a high-quality logo design by the end of the process.

Logo Design Process Step 2: Find your meaning

Designing a logo necessitates intuition and intelligence. While acquiring information can help you gain insight, intuition is something you’ll develop as you produce more logo design ideas. Look at the most successful brands in the world. You should be able to deduce meaning from their logos – something that communicates their brand message or idea, or demonstrates their personality.

A logo is more than simply a visual effect; it communicates what a company stands for, and if you can give your logo design ideas this sense of “meaning,” you’ll be well on your way. Beginning with some organised creative thought is the best method to achieve significance.

Extracting concepts, ideas, and keywords from the brief and grouping them into broad themes is the initiation. For each theme, we make a list of clichés, symbols, icons, and well-known visual language. In our logo design concepts, we look for crossovers, room for improvement, or the opportunity to create something unique. We don’t just draw; we conceptualise and design.

Let’s say we are designing a logo for a hypothetical corporation called “Generico.” We know Generico is a forward-thinking company with a slew of super-smart employees that aren’t afraid to question the status quo. This startup creates powerful logistic software that simplifies complex situations. Generico has, unfortunately, spent far too much time in the shadows. The business has determined that it has to invest, advertise its product, and grow into a more commercial beast.

Rather of re-designing an existing organisation, you’re creating a brand from the ground up. This means you have the ideal opportunity to express yourself through your design. How do you make Generico stand out using the information you already have?

Logo Design Process Step 3: Choose the right type of logo

A logo isn’t a brand. The word logo is short for logotype – graphic designer speak for a custom-lettered word. You can see why the term “logo” became so popular – it’s dead catchy. But, what people are usually referring to when they talk about a logo isn’t a word – but an emblem, symbol, monogram, initials, or any kind of graphic device used to represent a company, product, or service.


A logo, or brand mark, is the flag in front of every organisation. Just like people, logos come in different shapes, sizes, and varieties.


A logo can be as simple as a wordmark, or as complex as an image. There are no hard and fast rules about which approach works best. Experiment with your logo design ideas, but make sure that whatever you produce fits the brief.


Figuring out the design of a logo means not limiting your thinking to one particular approach. Why not be adventurous and try your hand at different logo design ideas? Test new formats, and find out what fits. What works? What doesn’t? Would the creative idea work better this way, or that way?


We try coming up with an idea for all the categories below, even if we have a hunch about what our client will go for. There’s always the opportunity to explore some combinations and crossovers between categories too.

  • Wordmarks: Can you convey brand personality through purely typographical means? Think FedEx, Braun, Tate, and Google.
  • Letterforms: Could your logo design be as simple as the company’s initials? Think IBM, Unilever, and Airbnb.
  • Pictorial marks: Could you simplify an immediately recognisable image? Think about Twitter, Shell, and Apple.
  • Emblems: s there a shape or holding device that the company name is inextricably connected with? Think Warner Bros, Starbucks, Harley Davidson, and Levis.
  • Abstract symbols: Can you invent a symbol that represents the brand? Think Pepsi, Nike, and Audi.

Logo Design Process Step 4: Looking at the bigger picture

The best logo design ideas come when we get to grips with the company structure and brand architecture. A strong understanding of the business future-proofs our concepts, and brings consistency to our client’s portfolio.


Before we unleash our creativity onto your logo design ideas, we think about where the logo will fit in the bigger picture. We get to grips with the structure of the company. What’s the fundamental framework of the organisation? Does it have sub-brands, or different services and products that fit together? Is there a master brand, or several different brands? Should different offerings feel like they are part of the same family? Or distant relatives?


Brand architecture, as it’s known, might not sound like the most exciting aspect of logo design, but tackling this first ensures good design ideas. Though information about business structure, along with associated internal politics are considered as part of our initial strategy work – it’s our job as a logo designer or logo design company to start making sense of things visually.


We sketch our ideas of the brand framework out, before we jump onto our workstation.


Broadly speaking, the brand architecture of most organisations falls into one of the following categories, or is a hybrid of them.

  • Monolithic: The brand uses a single visual identity and name across its full portfolio. For example, Virgin Atlantic, Virgin Media, Virgin Active and Virgin Money.
  • Endorsed: The organisation owns a variety of brands, each of which is endorsed by the group name. For example, Shredded Wheat by Nestlé, KitKat by Nestlé and Nescafé by Nestlé.
  • Branded: The organisation owns several brands or companies that appear to be unrelated. For example, Vauxhall, Chevrolet, Cadillac and Opel. All General Motors brands.



No two brand architectures are exactly alike, and no one structure is better than another. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages to consider. When considering logo design ideas, architecture will help you to plan, but remember that nothing is set in stone. It can be useful to develop a framework over time as trends and circumstances change. There’s an infinite level of scope for variation in each system. Remember to experiment, and don’t be afraid to suggest various alternatives to achieve the best logo design.

Logo Design Process Step 5: Understanding psychology

Our brains are naturally hardwired to process shapes before colour and words. That’s why the right symbol can allow businesses to stop using a name entirely.

The human brain processes sensory information in a very specific way. When it comes to logo design, you’ll find that you need a basic knowledge of human behaviour to create something that has a real impact. For instance, we tend to acknowledge shapes before language, which is worth bearing in mind when you’re creating a logo that needs to compete in a highly saturated sector. Logo design ideas that use distinct symbols can become more recognisable through repeat exposure. Nike and Apple are two great examples of companies who have used symbols to drop their name entirely.

Of all senses, our sight plays the most important role in creating a memorable experience of a brand. It’s worth thinking about how the brain can process your logo design ideas. Here are each of the elements we consider:

  • Shape: Shapes come first. We need shapes to identify an item or word. The brain acknowledges distinctive shapes better, leaving a lasting imprint on the memory.
  • Colour: Colours are the second most important feature in our sequence of cognition. Colours evoke emotions and unique perceptions, but must be used carefully. Some companies practically own a colour, like Coca Cola, or Facebook.
  • Type: Our brains take the most time to process language. This means that your content comes third in your logo design ideas. It’s important to keep this in mind when you’re working with a complex brand mark.

Logo Design Process Step 6: Generating a lot of Logo Concepts

Our brains are naturally hardwired to process shapes before colour and words. That’s why the right symbol can allow businesses to stop using a name entirely.

The human brain processes sensory information in a very specific way. When it comes to logo design, you’ll find that you need a basic knowledge of human behaviour to create something that has a real impact. For instance, we tend to acknowledge shapes before language, which is worth bearing in mind when you’re creating a logo that needs to compete in a highly saturated sector. Logo design ideas that use distinct symbols can become more recognisable through repeat exposure. Nike and Apple are two great examples of companies who have used symbols to drop their name entirely.

Of all senses, our sight plays the most important role in creating a memorable experience of a brand. It’s worth thinking about how the brain can process your logo design ideas. Here are each of the elements we consider:

  • Shape: Shapes come first. We need shapes to identify an item or word. The brain acknowledges distinctive shapes better, leaving a lasting imprint on the memory.
  • Colour: Colours are the second most important feature in our sequence of cognition. Colours evoke emotions and unique perceptions, but must be used carefully. Some companies practically own a colour, like Coca Cola, or Facebook.
  • Type: Our brains take the most time to process language. This means that your content comes third in your logo design ideas. It’s important to keep this in mind when you’re working with a complex brand mark.

Logo Design Process Step 7: Consideration of competition

We routinely advocate competitive analysis at Logos Associated because it is so important for developing a brand style and differentiating our clients from others in its industry. Most of the groundwork for our logo design concepts is done during the research and brand strategy stage. However, it’s still necessary for us to conduct a final search.


It’s pointless to create a fantastic logo if it’s nearly identical to one of your client’s closest competitors, or worse, one of the world’s most well-known companies.


We examine the brand’s competitors. In fact, we look at the entire industry. What are the symbols they use? What fonts are they employing? What are the colours that they use? To come up with some amazing logo design ideas, we need to do some research. Look for ways to distinguish our clients’ business.


We strive to present logo design ideas that are not only unique but also simple and timeless.

Logo Design Process Step 8: Working On The Orientation and Application

Today’s brand marks live in an increasingly complicated multi-channel environment. In layman’s terms, this means that how the logo design work as an app icon on the smartphone or in the Twitter feed is just as important as how it looks on traditional media, the side of a bus or behind the reception desk in the client’s office building.

We think about how the logo design will perform in multiple areas. For instance, how will this design work in a tall skinny space? How will it work in a wide shallow space? Does it still work in black and white? Could it be stitched onto a garment? Could it be screen printed on a balloon? We make sure that we can answer these questions as early as possible in the design process.

During this early stage of the project, we create some rough mock-ups of our logo designs.

Logo Design Process Step 9: Judge the shortlist properly

We set ourselves clear criteria that we use to judge our shortlist. This will help to avoid the problem of “design by committee”, and ensure we make the right choice for our client.

We use a scorecard to help judge decisions from an objective perspective. The card can include questions like:

  • Do my logo designs work in black and white?
  • Do my logo design ideas work across all media?
  • Will my concepts stand the test of time?
  • Are these images recognisable and memorable?
  • Are the logo design ideas I’ve shortlisted unique?
  • Do my logo ideas support the brand manifesto?
  • Are they representative of the brand as a whole?

We won’t always be able to pinpoint the logo design that your client will like most, but you will be able to use the criteria we’ve established to bring our minds back into focus on the task at hand. Remember, there’s a lot more to branding than a logo. While the brand mark can’t do everything alone, it can be a valuable part of a business image, thanks to the right shapes, typography, and colours.

Logo Design Process Step 10: Listening to Feedback Attentively

We listen to feedback constructively. Without completely abandoning our creative principals, we have to acknowledge that our personal preferences may not to make it to the finishing line.

Therefore we create a shortlist, one that contains just a few of our best logo design ideas. We ask our team members for opinion.

Logo Design Process Step 11: Refine

We take a step back and take a long, hard look at the masterpiece ahead. We make sure that our logo designs are legible in all different variants, sizes, and colours. We check the spacing between the characters, the symbols, and the typefaces we’ve used.

We know that it’s important to remember that the devil is in the detail. We double-check everything. That means making sure that the curves in the brand marks are as smooth as can be. That the spacing between each character is perfect, and that all shapes and symbols are in proper proportion.

Once we’ve got everything down to a fine art – we double-check it again. We zoom right in and check for any glitches. We print out the logo design as large as we possibly can and stare at it for a while, then scale it down to 100 pixels and see what happens. We won’t get another chance to perform this kind of due diligence. Once we’ve released the logo design into the wild, it’s gone for good – so we make sure to get it right the first time.

Logo Design Process Step 12: Deliver a robust master artwork

We create master artwork for every eventual application and channel that you might use – from full colour to single colour pieces on both print and digital platforms. We make sure that we test all the different file formats before we hand over the final artwork for implementation.

Need A Logo Designed?

Get in touch with Logos Associated to see if we are the right fit for you.